Top Reverse Mortgage Lenders 2015

2015 top reverse mortgage lender

Released: September 4, 2015 | Author: ( CFPB ) 2015 HMDA Final Rule. The biggest lenders in 2014 reflected a highly fiercely contested mortgage lending environment. Today we are publishing our information on the biggest mortgage lenders in 2014. Continuing with our past practice, we are publishing these ratings up to the point where there is no clear link between a large number of lenders who all have the same rounding of credit. This means that for the year in review there is a top 20 ranking of companies both in terms of volume of loans and in terms of balance due - as was the case in 2013.

Total GDP loans last year showed sharp 14% increase to 203bn (excluding loans to residential property companies, which the Bank of England recently deleted from its mortgage credit data) to £203bn. According to the updated bank figures, we are still far from the level reached at its height in 2007, when total loans amounted to £357 billion.

With the exception of the following, all CML membership numbers refer to the year: year: year: Shares of solvency ratios refer to the aggregate ratios reported by the Bank of England. By April 2015, the bank modified all its mortgage information to rule out loans to residential property companies. Shown here, the 2013 audience shares are derived from this new aggregate audience and therefore differ from those previously reported.

Wherever possible, total loans are reported net of portfolio purchases. The numbers are round to the next 100 million pounds and ordered on the same base. Where possible, the numbers are presented on the Group' s own merits. Numbers and ranking lists for prior years have been restated to reflect last year's merger and acquisition activities.

The Royal Bank of Scotland numbers do not contain the group members Topaz Finance and Ulster Bank. However, this year's results continue to be supported by public homebuyer incentives and extremely low interest rate differentials, which give the residential property sector an impetus that was not there before the loan squeeze. Nevertheless, the level of activities and competitiveness in the 2014 financial markets looked more "normal" than we saw during the crisis.

Loan origination to both homebuyers and buy-to-lease lenders has grown, providing lenders with opportunity in all industries and, by and large, companies of all types and size have been playing a role. Figure 1 shows how it appears that there has been a normalisation in recent two or three years in terms of concentrations. Ahead of the onset of the loan squeeze, there was increasing pressure to compete for funding, with the six biggest lenders showing a decline in their proportion of new funding, which accounted for around 60% of total funding in 2007.

However, during the period of credit crunch, the dual effect of the exit of lenders from the markets and mergers of other companies led to a significant turnaround, with 86% of new lending in 2009 coming from the six biggest lenders. This strong focus has gradually subsided in the following years, with smaller lenders again accounting for a greater proportion of new mortgage lending.

In the past year, the six biggest lenders made up 72% of lending, although this has hardly moved since 2013, while the second category - ranking from 7th to 20th in our ranking - made up 20%, again flat compared to 2013. The sums displayed are estimated on the basis of the overall volume of the FCA reported by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) from the lenders' samples who report on the overall volume of the markets.

We revise our historic data when the FCA makes changes to the overall fair values. However, there are always upward and downward moves in the ranking lists, pushed by credit possibilities and credit demands as well as different types of businesses and schedules. Santander was at the top for the second consecutive year of rapid expansion - up 50% on 2013 - to recover second place on the ranking lists.

Overall, the six biggest lenders recorded 17% strong asset expansion. However, the underlying lenders (those in places seven to 20) recorded significantly higher overall economic expansion of 46%. It is noteworthy that four lenders recorded very strong volume expansion, each pushing up a number of positions in the GDP loan table:

The Bank of Ireland tripled its loans in 2015, and OneSavings Bank (88%), Paragon (75%) and Clydesdale (61%) also recorded significant expansion. With the exception of the following, all CML membership numbers refer to the year: year: year: Shares of solvency ratios refer to total ratios reported by the Bank of England. By April 2015, the bank modified all its mortgage information to rule out loans to residential property companies.

Shown here, the 2013 audience shares are derived from this new aggregate audience and therefore differ from those previously reported. Wherever possible, estimates of exposure are presented net of portfolio purchases. The numbers are round to the next 100 million pounds and ordered on the same base. Where possible, the numbers are presented on the Group' s own account.

Numbers and ranking lists for prior years have been restated to reflect last year's merger and acquisition activities. The Royal Bank of Scotland numbers do not contain the group members Topaz Finance and Ulster Bank. Considering the mortgage balance due (see Table 2), the extent of the changes is much smaller.

This is what we would anticipate, as a significant rise (or fall) in an investor's single loan officer activities in one year will have less effect on the amount of the company's loan portfolio overdue. Although in 2014 GLA was 14% higher than in the previous year, the overall effect on balance in arrears was insignificant, with mortgage asset totals for the 20 biggest companies rising from £1,159bn to £1,171bn or around 1%.

Some lenders' preliminary results to date suggest that next year we expect to present a similar image of lenders' economic recovery and competitiveness when we release a full 2015 line-up of the biggest lenders.

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